Blog post

5 Things You should Know when You Plan to Travel

Taco Winter

Tipping can be confusing as the protocol varies by country. In some parts of the world, tipping can be considered rude, whereas in other areas, it is rude to avoid it. Here’s a primer on the tradition.

Always carry the local currency

Being ready for whatever expenses pop up is an important part of being an organized traveller. “Tipping in local currency is important because changing money actually costs the service provider and they very likely cannot make change for foreign money,” says Carrie Glenn, founder of Etiquette at Hand. Also, it is often impossible to add a tip when paying with your credit card (Think, Starbucks).

Know when not to tip

Be sure to research your destination: In some countries (like Japan, China, South Korea and French Polynesia), staff may be offended when offered a tip because excellent service is an expected part of their culture. “If you do offer—say to staff at a Japanese ryokan, taxi driver or tour guide—be sure to place the bills in a card or envelope and use two hands and a bow or nod (depending on the culture) to present it,” says Glenn. Always ask, “May I present you a tip in appreciation for your service?” while looking down, rather than just handing it to them. Be discreet, humble and do not press if they refuse. Even when in Canada, it’s sometimes confusing as when to tip and when not to tip. “Tipping in French Polynesia is almost considered to be rude and making the people feel lower than you,” says Dan Boland, an international airline pilot. Even tipping for great service is frowned upon. If in doubt, just don’t do it.

Only tip for services rendered

For example, make sure that you have actually received the kind of help that would require a tip. “Some beggars ask for tips, so giving them money in this instance sends the wrong message,” says Glenn. Since this is an extremely poor country, try buying their goods or hiring them to do a small task if you feel compelled to give them money.

Check your bill before tipping

Many restaurants, hotels, and other establishments in the U.K. (England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales), Chile, Brazil, Portugal, and many other countries already add a service charge. “An exception is Dubai—where the added service fee usually goes to the owners, rather than your server. Be sure to personally hand the server an additional tip in this case,” says Glenn. And check whether the bill specifies a service “charge,” as opposed to service “tax,” before thinking you’ve been charged the tip. A “tax” does not go to the servers. One note on Brazil: “Tipping is really not required even though they would like it due to small wages,” says Boland. Of course in tourist spots, the workers have become accustomed to Canadians giving small amounts.

When you may want to add more

In Iceland, just like much of Europe, tipping is neither required nor expected in most situations. “Restaurants will often include a service charge of around 10 per cent on bills which alleviates the necessity to tip—but feel free to leave 10-15 per cent if you had great service,” says Jessica Bisesto, senior editor at TravelPirates. Taxi drivers, hairdressers, and tour guides include fees with prices that cover their services.

While a tip isn’t always necessary in London, the practice is gaining a following. “It is customary to leave 10-15 per cent of the bill when eating out. However, restaurants often add on a customary service charge, usually 12.5 per cent, especially if you’re eating out with a large group,” says Tristan Seymour, Managing Director for Lodging-World. Make sure you check your bill before tipping, if the service charge is included in the total, then you don’t need to leave a tip (unless you want to tip twice!). For black cabs and licensed minicabs, it is polite to tip 10-15 per cent of the fare. “If you’ve had a longer journey and the taxi driver was very helpful (assisted you with luggage, for example), you may wish to tip more. Most people simply round the total fare up to the nearest £ and tell the driver to keep the change,

Prev Post Next Post